Posts for category: Dental Procedures

ImplantOverdenturesaMarriageofOptionsforLowerJawToothReplacement

For well over a century, removable dentures have been the main treatment option for patients suffering from severe or total edentulism (loss of teeth). In recent years, however, the dental implant has been recognized as the best option because it can provide patients with permanent tooth replacement, and even more so as implant technology continues to advance.

But while permanent tooth replacement using implants offer more comfort and a better fit than dentures, they are more expensive, sometimes out of the financial reach of many patients. There is, however, one alternative for the lower jaw that blends the two options for tooth replacement into one. This alternative is known as an implant overdenture.

The implant overdenture begins just as a fixed dental implant would: we surgically implant two titanium posts into the lower jaw and allow them to fuse with the bone over time (thanks to the unique way that bone interacts with titanium). But rather than next affixing a porcelain crown to the post as we would with a dental implant, we would instead fashion a denture that fits over the two posts (hence the term overdenture). The overdenture has receiver sites that connect securely with the titanium posts to hold the overdenture in place. This ensures a snug fit with no slippage — resulting in better ability for the wearer to chew food and speak — and without the continuous need for dental adhesive. And just as with traditional dentures, you can remove the overdenture for cleaning.

It might also be an optimal solution for patients with severe issues involving bone loss or compromised teeth that make it difficult for them to support either a fixed prosthesis or a traditional removable denture.

This option does have some drawbacks: since it's still a removable denture, it can still move during meals and food can sometimes get underneath it, which can be annoying. Also, overdentures for the upper jaw require more than two implants because the upper bone is less dense; thus because of a greater number of implants, an upper overdenture is more costly than a lower one.

In the end, an implant overdenture to the lower jaw might be an optimal solution for you — financially and practically — to restore function from severe or total edentulism.

If you would like more information on implant overdentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implant Overdentures for the Lower Jaw.”

By Wayne J. Gary II D.D.S.
August 22, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
EvolutionsinTooth-ColoredFillings

Tooth-colored fillings are just one of the many ways that cosmetic dentistry has evolved over the past few decades. There was once a time where having a cavity treated meant that you would be left with a noticeable metal filling. However, today we have an array of tools and materials available that help make tooth repair more like creating a fine piece of art.

Tooth-colored fillings are made of composite resin, which is a mixture of plastic and glass. Composite resin is not only more aesthetically pleasing, but also better for your teeth than metal fillings. Metal fillings can require your dentist to remove healthy parts of your tooth to create a ledge (undercut) that locks the filling in place. Tooth-colored fillings do not need this undercut to stay in place. In fact, they physically attach, or bond, to natural tooth structure. The procedure is also very simple. We'll apply the composite resin directly to your teeth, sculpt it and then finally harden it with a special light. When you see the results, you will be amazed at how natural and lifelike the restoration appears.

Another advantage of tooth-colored fillings is that they are strong and flexible. When you bite or chew, they will absorb and transfer the forces, just like your natural teeth. Metal fillings are strong, but they are also stiff, which can stress your teeth and make them more susceptible to cracking.

During your examination, we will evaluate if tooth-colored fillings are the best tooth repair option. If your cavity is too large for composite resin, we may recommend a porcelain filling. This procedure may require two appointments: the porcelain filling will be crafted in a dental laboratory, and we will then place this filling at your next visit.

If you would like more information about tooth-colored fillings, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Natural Beauty of Tooth-Colored Fillings.”

WhiteningisaSafeandEffectiveWaytogetThatHollywoodSmile

The “Hollywood Smile” — dazzlingly white — is associated in our society with youth, health and vitality. Achieving that smile through either professional or home whitening applications has become very popular.

Teeth become discolored or dull for a number of reasons. It can be something intrinsic with the teeth — changes in enamel or dental structure during development, inherited disorders, heavy exposure to fluoride or tetracycline, or changes in mineral structure or wear due to aging. It can also be extrinsic, resulting from environmental or lifestyle causes. Eating foods with tannins (red wine, coffee or tea) or carotene pigments found in plant foods like oranges or carrots, or using tobacco may all cause staining.

Most modern applications involve an oxidizing chemical (usually hydrogen peroxide) that bleaches the teeth. Professional applications in a dentist's office use high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (usually 35 to 45%) applied directly to the teeth with control measures to protect the lips and gums. This type of application can lighten the color of teeth up to ten shades.

There are a number of home options too: whitening strips, “Paint on” or “Brush on” whitening, and even whitening gum. We can also provide you with a “Take home” kit that resembles the professional application but is generally less expensive. Although all these home applications are generally safe and effective, they typically take longer for results (several repeated days as opposed to about one hour for an office application), and not always to the same level of lightness as the professional.

Just about anyone can be a candidate for a whitening application. However, if you have thinner than normal dentin and more porous enamel, or suffer from gum recession or enamel loss, then whitening may increase tooth sensitivity. And, whitening is not a permanent solution: the brightness will fade over time, usually within a year. You can slow the fading by avoiding foods and habits that contribute to staining. It's also possible to touch up the initial whitening once or twice a year to extend the life of your new, bright smile.

If you would like more information on teeth whitening, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Whitening.”

By Wayne J. Gary II D.D.S.
July 08, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tooth-ColoredFillingsTrueorFalse

Do you have silver dental fillings that you wish you didn't have? Wouldn't it be nice if no one could look in your mouth and see how many cavities you had as a kid? Tooth-colored fillings may offer a solution to the problem of too much metal in your mouth. How much do you really know about non-metallic tooth-colored fillings? Take our quiz and find out.

True or false: Tooth-colored fillings are a radical new technology.

False. A variety of dental porcelains and composite resins have been successfully used in tooth restoration for many years. These materials have been designed to mimic the properties of the two major components of teeth: the hard outer enamel, and the bone-like inner dentin. Our increasing understanding of tooth structure and composition has led to better and more natural-looking filling substances.

True or false: Teeth must remain rigid under the pressure of the bite.

False. At one time, metal amalgam (silver) fillings were preferred because of their extreme hardness. But we now know that the crowns of our teeth actually flex under the forces of the bite. This discovery has spurred the development of new methods and materials to stabilize the restored tooth and reduce the incidence of premature failure.

True or false: It's usually more complicated to put in a tooth-colored filling than a metal one.

False. Regardless of which material is used, the basic process of filling a tooth is the same. The dentist prepares the tooth for treatment, removes decay, and places a filling directly into the tooth. If the filling is moderately deep, a tooth-colored filling may be set in several layers which are successively “cured” or hardened. More extensive restorations may require more than one visit, but the natural-looking results generally justify the extra time.

True or false: Regular metal fillings make the tooth structure stronger.

False. Properly securing an amalgam filling may require the tooth to be “undercut,” meaning that a greater amount of healthy tooth material must be removed. This can weaken the tooth structure, eventually leading it to chip and crack. Non-metallic fillings don't require undercutting, so more tooth structure is left intact. This more conservative treatment can result in a stronger, longer-lasting restoration.

True or false: Non-metallic (tooth-colored) fillings are safer than silver fillings.

False. While each method has advantages and disadvantages, and may not be an appropriate treatment in every situation, both methods have been deemed safe and effective by major U.S. and international science and health organizations. While there have been recent concerns about mercury in amalgam fillings, there is presently no reason to believe that it presents any cause for concern.

If you would like more information about tooth-colored fillings, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Natural Beauty of Tooth-Colored Fillings.”

By Wayne J. Gary II D.D.S.
June 13, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
AWhiterSmiletheProfessionalWay

Have you ever wondered why your smile is not as white as it used to be? Well, there may be a few different reasons that your teeth have become discolored over the years. The change in color may simply be due to wear and tear from aging. It may also be a result of dietary factors, because foods containing tannins, such as red wine, coffee and tea are known to discolor teeth. Tobacco use, whether smoking or chewing, is another common cause of stains on your teeth.

So, what should you do if you decide you would like a whiter smile? You should first make an appointment with our office, so that we can assess the root cause of the discoloration. We may recommend a quick and easy solution with in-office whitening, sometimes known as power bleaching.

An in-office whitening treatment can lighten your teeth three to eight shades in just one office visit! During your whitening treatment, we will first protect your lips, gums and cheeks, leaving only your teeth exposed. Then, we will apply a professional strength bleaching gel to your teeth. We may use a special light to make the bleach work faster. The great advantage of this treatment is that your smile will become noticeably whiter in just an hour!

If you would prefer to whiten in the comfort of your home, we can give you a take-home whitening kit. First, we will make molds of your mouth, from which we will create thin plastic mouth trays that fit your teeth exactly. You'll apply the whitening gel to the trays and wear them on your teeth 30 minutes a day, twice a week, for about six weeks. While your teeth may not whiten as fast as in our office, if you wear them as directed, you'll still see great results.

Though you may always be able to find a whitening solution in the aisle of your grocery store, remember that the best way to ensure the results you want is to get a professional treatment.

If you would like more information about teeth whitening, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Whitening.”


















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